An analysis of the use of symbolism in the overcoat by nikol golgol

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An analysis of the use of symbolism in the overcoat by nikol golgol

Nikolai Gogol The Overcoat In the department of -- but it is better not to mention the department. There is nothing more irritable than departments, regiments, courts of justice, and, in a word, every branch of public service.

Each individual attached to them nowadays thinks all society insulted in his person. Quite recently a complaint was received from a justice of the peace, in which he plainly demonstrated that all the imperial institutions were going to the dogs, and that the Czar's sacred name was being taken in vain; and in proof he appended to the complaint a romance in which the justice of the peace is made to appear about once every ten lines, and sometimes in a drunken condition.

An analysis of the use of symbolism in the overcoat by nikol golgol

Therefore, in order to avoid all unpleasantness, it will be better to describe the department in question only as a certain department. So, in a certain department there was a certain official -- not a very high one, it must be allowed -- short of stature, somewhat pock-marked, red-haired, and short-sighted, with a bald forehead, wrinkled cheeks, and a complexion of the kind known as sanguine.

Petersburg climate was responsible for this.

The Overcoat Summary & Analysis from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

As for his official status, he was what is called a perpetual titular councillor, over which, as is well known, some writers make merry, and crack their jokes, obeying the praiseworthy custom of attacking those who cannot bite back.

His family name was Bashmatchkin. This name is evidently derived from "bashmak" shoe ; but when, at what time, and in what manner, is not known.

His father and grandfather, and all the Bashmatchkins, always wore boots, which only had new heels two or three times a year. His name was Akakiy Akakievitch. It may strike the reader as rather singular and far-fetched, but he may rest assured that it was by no means far-fetched, and that the circumstances were such that it would have been impossible to give him any other.

This is how it came about. Akakiy Akakievitch was born, if my memory fails me not, in the evening of the 23rd of March. His mother, the wife of a Government official and a very fine woman, made all due arrangements for having the child baptised. She was lying on the bed opposite the door; on her right stood the godfather, Ivan Ivanovitch Eroshkin, a most estimable man, who served as presiding officer of the senate, while the godmother, Anna Semenovna Byelobrushkova, the wife of an officer of the quarter, and a woman of rare virtues.

They offered the mother her choice of three names, Mokiya, Sossiya, or that the child should be called after the martyr Khozdazat. I truly never heard the like.

Varada or Varukh might have been borne, but not Triphiliy and Varakhasiy! And since such is the case, it will be better to name him after his father. His father's name was Akakiy, so let his son's be Akakiy too.

They christened the child, whereat he wept and made a grimace, as though he foresaw that he was to be a titular councillor.

The Overcoat Analysis

We have mentioned it in order that the reader might see for himself that it was a case of necessity, and that it was utterly impossible to give him any other name. When and how he entered the department, and who appointed him, no one could remember.

However much the directors and chiefs of all kinds were changed, he was always to be seen in the same place, the same attitude, the same occupation; so that it was afterwards affirmed that he had been born in undress uniform with a bald head.

No respect was shown him in the department. The porter not only did not rise from his seat when he passed, but never even glanced at him, any more than if a fly had flown through the reception-room.

His superiors treated him in coolly despotic fashion. Some sub-chief would thrust a paper under his nose without so much as saying, "Copy," or "Here's a nice interesting affair," or anything else agreeable, as is customary amongst well-bred officials. And he took it, looking only at the paper and not observing who handed it to him, or whether he had the right to do so; simply took it, and set about copying it.

Full online text of The Overcoat by Nikolai Gogol. Other short stories by Nikolai Gogol also available along with many others by classic and contemporary authors. short stories interactive word games. Nikolai Gogol. The Overcoat. In the department of -- but it is better not to mention the department. There is nothing more irritable than. The Overcoat Summary & Analysis from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes. Sign In Sign Up. Lit. Guides. Lit. Terms. Shakespeare. LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The Overcoat, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work. and he consequently adds another layer of symbolism to the overcoat itself. But. "A powerful analysis of why and how mass incarceration is happening in America, The New Jim Crow should be required reading for anyone working for real change in an analysis of the use of symbolism in the overcoat by nikol golgol the.

The young officials laughed at and made fun of him, so far as their official wit permitted; told in his presence various stories concocted about him, and about his landlady, an old woman of seventy; declared that she beat him; asked when the wedding was to be; and strewed bits of paper over his head, calling them snow.

But Akakiy Akakievitch answered not a word, any more than if there had been no one there besides himself. It even had no effect upon his work: But if the joking became wholly unbearable, as when they jogged his hand and prevented his attending to his work, he would exclaim, "Leave me alone!

Why do you insult me?"The Overcoat" is a short story by Ukrainian-born Russian author Nikolai Gogol, published in The story and its author have had great influence on Russian literature, as expressed in a quote attributed to Fyodor Dostoyevsky: "We all come out from Gogol's 'Overcoat'." The story has been adapted into a variety of stage and film interpretations.

The Overcoat Analysis Literary Devices in The Overcoat. Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory.

The Overcoat

Setting. Nikolai Gogol grew up in hard times for Russia. When he was 17 years old in , a group of revolutionaries called the Decembrists (no, not the band) tried to overthrow the czarist regime.

Of cour. The Overcoat Essay Examples. 7 total results. A New Lease in Life in Nikolai Gogol's Story the Overcoat An Interpretation of the Poor People in The Diary of a Madman, The Overcoat and Taman.

1, words. 3 pages. An Analysis of The Overcoat, a Story by Nikolay Gogol An Analysis of the Use of Symbolism in The Overcoat by Nikol Golgol.

The overcoat in Gogol's "The Overcoat" represents the human condition that society offers him Akakiy Akakievitch as he suffers from the lack of compassion and a parallel lack of warm overcoat.

In. The Overcoat study guide contains a biography of Nikolai Gogol, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. An Analysis of the Use of Symbolism in The Overcoat by Nikol Golgol PAGES 3. WORDS View Full Essay.

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Short Stories: The Overcoat by Nikolai Gogol